See on Scoop.itshubush design & wellbeing

The symposium Evaporation of Things is intended to explore the increasingly digital interface to biological ‘things’. From the phylogenetic analysis of plants, to the data representation of the human genome project, studying the subject on a screen has replaced the study of the material artefact. For the general public, astronomy remains a question of looking at the stars in the night sky, whereas for astronomers the use of optical telescopes is a thing of the past – so the question emerges “where is the thing?”

Over two half-days we are gathering artists and designers as well as scientists and other scholars to share understandings and affordances offered by their ways of knowing living things through data. In addition to presentations and discussions we invite all the participants in the symposium to bring a material and/or an immaterial manifestation of a ‘thing’ to a Show & Tell Workshop.

The Evaporation of Things will be documented by bloggers Pat Kane and Ken MacLeod with transcriptions from presentations, images of artworks and documentation from the Show and Tell to be published in Ubiquity: The Journal for Pervasive Media, Intellect.

petabush‘s insight:

looks like a fascinating two days

See on www.evaporationofthings.com

See on Scoop.itshubush design & wellbeing

See on www.museion.ku.dk

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petabush‘s insight:

@wildcat always offers an enjoyable and thorough read. looking forward to next installment…

See on spacecollective.org

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The first bionic hand that allows an amputee to feel what they are touching will be transplanted later this year in a pioneering operation that could introduce a new generation of artificial limbs with sensory perception.
The wiring of his new bionic hand will be connected to the patient’s nervous system with the hope that the man will be able to control the movements of the hand as well as receiving touch signals from the hand’s skin sensors.

See on www.independent.co.uk

See on Scoop.itshubush augment

Why make tiny flying drones when you can fly real insects by remote-control? It could lead to a neuroscience revolution, explains Emily Anthes in an excerpt from her new book Frankenstein’s Cat

See on www.guardian.co.uk

See on Scoop.itshubush healthwear

Wearable devices like the Nike+ FuelBand, Jawbone UP, larklife, and future products like the Misfit Shine and Google Glass have been the subject of much discussion, for good reason: They give us access to information …

petabush‘s insight:

good points raised

See on blogs.forrester.com

See on Scoop.itshubush healthwear

Local woman turns stark medical devices into works of art
WCNC
The bands, medical devices used on babies with head deformities, are increasingly popular and used by doctors to correct a number of medical issues in newborns and infants.

See on www.wcnc.com