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An iron bead found inside a 5,000-year-old tomb was crafted from a meteorite.

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Coinciding with our ‘SHOWcabinet: Prosthetics’ exhibition, SHOWstudio engages in the discussions and debates surrounding disability by offering artists, models and thinkers an open forum to communicate their views and research.

petabush‘s insight:

fascinating!

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Coinciding with our ‘SHOWcabinet: Prosthetics’ exhibition, SHOWstudio engages in the discussions and debates surrounding disability by offering artists, models and thinkers an open forum to communicate their views and research.

 

“Artificial limb makers were sometimes likened to fashionable hairdressers and wigmakers (perhaps reflecting the origins of both in barber-surgery), recasting the body in fantastic and fashionable forms, using artificial means to supplement natural deficiencies.”

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Startup companies are coming up with new technologies aimed at getting people to take medicine only as directed.

 

Taking medication haphazardly—skipping doses, lapsing between refills or taking pills beyond their expiration date—has been linked to health complications and hundreds of millions of wasted dollars for insurers and hospitals.

 “After six months’ time, only half of people taking prescription medicines are taking them as directed,” said Troyen Brennan, chief medical officer of drug retailer CVS Caremark Corp. 

Health insurers and pharmacy-benefits managers like CVS have long relied on robo-calls, mailers and face-to-face meetings with pharmacists to keep patients on their dosing schedule.

 

Now they are evaluating a range of more cost-effective technologies, from pills and bottles with digital sensors, to data analytics software and social games that offer patients rewards.

 

Insurers and pharmacies are motivated in part by Medicare, which offers financial rewards for proving their members have improved their overall adherence to medication schedules.

 

They also stand to benefit if their members are healthier. The New England Healthcare Institute estimates that some $290 billion in costs is wasted each year on unnecessary hospital and doctor visits by people who failed to comply with their medication schedule.

 

CVS is pilot-testing technology from Virginia-based RxAnte Inc., which sells an analytics platform that looks at millions of patients’ claims data and clinical data to identify people at highest risk of failing to comply with doctors’ orders.

 

These patients include people with a spotty track record of adherence, those who take several different medicines or those facing unwanted side effects, Chief Executive Josh Benner said.

 

“It’s all a targeting game,” Mr. Benner said. “We predict individual behaviors, and suggest interventions.”

 

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Bioelectronics is the field of developing medicines that use electrical impulses to modulate the body’s neural circuits as an alternative to drug-based interventions. How far away are we from having these very targeted “electroceuticals”?

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Putting a digital face to the abusive voices in their head could help people with schizophrenia.

 

Results of a preliminary trial, announced today at the Wellcome Trust in London, demonstrated how people with schizophrenia could overcome their auditory hallucinations by conversing with an avatar representation of the voice in their head.

 

At the start of the trial, 16 people with schizophrenia created an on-screen avatar that best matched what they imagined the voice in their head to look like – much like a police photo-fit. They then chose a male or female voice closely resembling the one they hear.

 

By conversing with a therapist via the avatar, the volunteers reported reduced levels of distress and higher self-esteem. Three people stopped hearing the hallucinatory voice altogether – including one who had lived with it for 16 years.

See on www.newscientist.com