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Dutch artist Theo Jansen is famous for his massive walking Strandbeest sculptures. Now, he’s releasing miniature and much cuter! 3-D printed versions.

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See on Scoop.itshubush design & wellbeing

Designs by Mother Nature – Biomimetic Products

Designs by Mother Nature – Biomimetic Products is now open for visitors.

Curated by Barcelona-based design and architectural studio, Estudi Ramon Folch (ERF) and ‘Materials Man’ Chris Lefteri, the exhibition offers an introduction to the topic of biomimicry in design.

Designed by Sam Jacobs, founder of FAT Architecture, the layout of the exhibition encourages visitors to explore the space and discover the impact nature has on design through the photographs, models, videos and products on display.”

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See on Scoop.itshubush healthwear

This wearable design concept helps epilepsy sufferers manage symptoms, predict potential seizures and alert passersby or loved ones when having a fit.

See on www.dezeen.com

See on Scoop.itshubush design & wellbeing

There’s a rule of thumb in surgery—the less invasive the procedure, the better. Less invasive surgeries reduce patient discomfort, foster faster recoveries, and limit the risk of infection. Problem is, you have to get your eyes on a problem to solve it.

In heart surgery, for example, practitioners use external ultrasound to view blockages. The images are useful, but they are only good enough to serve as a general guide. Georgia Tech researchers, led by Professor F. Levent Degertekin, think they can improve the situation and even reduce the frequency of invasive heart surgery.

“If you’re a doctor, you want to see what is going on inside the arteries and inside the heart, but most of the devices being used for this today provide only cross-sectional images,” Degertekin says.

The group is building a tiny wired ultrasound device that surgeons can snake through arteries to provide a 3D, front-facing image of blockages in real time—the “equivalent of a flashlight” in the heart’s lightless passageways.

There are, of course, already internal ultrasound devices. These are used to image various organs—the stomach, for instance, by way of the esophagus. What makes this particular device special is its size and ability to travel into smaller pathways.

See on singularityhub.com

See on Scoop.itshubush healthwear

And you thought managing a smartphone and an inbox was exhausting.

45-year-old Chris Dancy is known as the most connected man in the world. He has between 300 and 700 systems running at any given time, systems that capture real-time data about his life.

His wrists are covered with a variety of wearable technology, including the fitness wristband tracker Fitbit and the Pebble smartwatch. He weighs himself on the Aria Wi-Fi scale, uses smartphone controlled Hue lighting at home and sleeps on a Beddit mattress cover to track his sleep.

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Conclusions of the first ever cross-stakeholder, pan-european seminar on health apps, held at the King’s Fund on 28 October 2013.

 

The five key messages:

 

1. Overhauling healthcare systems–making them patient-centric

2. Engaging doctors in the prescribing of health apps
3. Overseeing quality standards for health apps
4. Ensuring that health apps remain of a high standard throughout their lifetime
5. Considerations for policymakers wishing to oversee health apps

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See on Scoop.itshubush design & wellbeing

Recent data show that a patient gets to speak for an average of 12-15 seconds before a doctor interrupts. The practice of narrative medicine, which favors listening to patients’ histories and feelings, has seen a resurgence in recent years. In this hour of All Sides, we’ll explore the surprising ways in which stories can heal the body.

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