A bio-inspired prototype “soft robot” material with greater dexterity and mobility than conventional hard robots has been created by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering.

“In biology, directed movement involves some form of shape changes, such as the expansion and contraction of muscles,” said Anna C. Balazs, PhD, the Swanson School’s Distinguished Professor of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. “So we asked whether we could mimic these basic interconnected functions in a synthetic system so that it could simultaneously change its shape and move.”

Source: www.kurzweilai.net

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French cosmetics firm L’Oreal is teaming up with bio-engineering start-up Organovo to 3D-print human skin.

It said the printed skin would be used in product tests.

Organovo has already made headlines with claims that it can 3D-print a human liver but this is its first tie-up with the cosmetics industry.

Experts said the science might be legitimate but questioned why a beauty firm would want to print skin.

L’Oreal currently grows skin samples from tissues donated by plastic surgery patients. It produces more than 100,000, 0.5 sq cm skin samples per year and grows nine varieties across all ages and ethnicities.

Its statement explaining the advantage of printing skin, offered little detail: “Our partnership will not only bring about new advanced in vitro methods for evaluating product safety and performance, but the potential for where this new field of technology and research can take us is boundless.”

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

See on Scoop.itshubush digital

The futuristic boots are made from a shell, 3D printed by specialists Shapeways, using a material called Elasto Plastic which is similar to nylon. The bonkers design is the work of Sols’ collaborator on the project, Continuum Fashion.

But it doesn’t stop there, a 3D printed inner boot can be completely customised to the wearer based on a 3D scan of the feet and ankles. And custom insoles inside, also 3D printed, will have air bags and air pockets to precisely alter the fit.

Source: www.wareable.com

See on Scoop.itshubush digital

French cosmetics firm L’Oreal is teaming up with bio-engineering start-up Organovo to 3D-print human skin.

It said the printed skin would be used in product tests.

Organovo has already made headlines with claims that it can 3D-print a human liver but this is its first tie-up with the cosmetics industry.

Experts said the science might be legitimate but questioned why a beauty firm would want to print skin.

L’Oreal currently grows skin samples from tissues donated by plastic surgery patients. It produces more than 100,000, 0.5 sq cm skin samples per year and grows nine varieties across all ages and ethnicities.

Its statement explaining the advantage of printing skin, offered little detail: “Our partnership will not only bring about new advanced in vitro methods for evaluating product safety and performance, but the potential for where this new field of technology and research can take us is boundless.”

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

See on Scoop.itshubush design & wellbeing

Ocumetics Bionic Lens could give you vision 3x better than 20/20

Source: www.cbc.ca

See on Scoop.itshubush augment

These 3D printed, over-sized knickers have been inspired by the human gastrointestinal tract and are designed to be full of channels for cyanobacteria and E.coli

Source: www.newscientist.com

See on Scoop.itshubush design & wellbeing

Scientists have uncovered a technique used by a zebrafish and other animals to create their own sunscreen and then reproduced it in the lab. They say the method could one day be used to produce sun lotion for humans and other pharmaceuticals.

Source: www.gizmag.com

See on Scoop.itshubush design & wellbeing

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